Analysis of the poem by countee cullen yet do i marvel

Sisyphus, in Greek mythology, is punished in the underworld by being forced to roll a huge boulder up a hill. In other words, their stories are mere myths.

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In lines of the poem, the speaker alludes to the classical myths of both Tantalus and Sisyphus. When the boulder had been rolled to the very top, it inevitably rolls over and down the other side of the hill, thus forcing Sisyphus to repeat the process endlessly.

In lines of the poem, the speaker alludes to the classical myths of both Tantalus and Sisyphus. Yet he can in fact reach neither: The speaker compares himself, as a black poet, to Tantalus because the speaker, even more than most poets, continually runs the risk of denial and disappointment.

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His story, he suggests, is not a simple myth but a very painful reality. He suggests that God might be able to Make plain the reason tortured Tantalus Is baited by the fickle fruit, [and] declare If merely brute caprice dooms Sisyphus To struggle up a never-ending stair.

The speaker compares himself, as a black poet, to Sisyphus because the speaker, even more than most poets, continually runs the risk of frustration, of doing endless work without achieving any satisfying or enduring results.

He suggests that God might be able to Make plain the reason tortured Tantalus Is baited by the fickle fruit, [and] declare If merely brute caprice dooms Sisyphus To struggle up a never-ending stair.

His story, he suggests, is not a simple myth but a very painful reality. Ironically, Tantalus and Sisyphus were both being punished for actual infractions they had committed.

Ironically, Tantalus and Sisyphus were both being punished for actual infractions they had committed. Sisyphus, in Greek mythology, is punished in the underworld by being forced to roll a huge boulder up a hill. Yet he can in fact reach neither: The speaker compares himself, as a black poet, to Tantalus because the speaker, even more than most poets, continually runs the risk of denial and disappointment.

In other words, their stories are mere myths. The speaker compares himself, as a black poet, to Sisyphus because the speaker, even more than most poets, continually runs the risk of frustration, of doing endless work without achieving any satisfying or enduring results.

When the boulder had been rolled to the very top, it inevitably rolls over and down the other side of the hill, thus forcing Sisyphus to repeat the process endlessly.Feb 23,  · In this poem Countee Cullen uses allusions* and enjambment** to explore the idea of God's incomprehensible nature and illustrate the poet's confusion at why he was made a.

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Get an answer for 'In Countee Cullen's poem "Yet Do I Marvel," what are some implications of the allusions to classical myths?' and find homework help for other Yet Do I Marvel questions at eNotes.

Fukuoka | Japan Fukuoka | Japan. Get an answer for 'In Countee Cullen's poem "Yet Do I Marvel," what are some implications of the allusions to classical myths?' and find homework help for other Yet Do I Marvel questions at eNotes. There are many interesting online pages with biographical details of W.E.B.

Du Bois () and various aspects of his life, writings, and activities.

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Analysis of the poem by countee cullen yet do i marvel
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